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Ravenscraig Castle
Just east of Kirkcaldy, Fife


Ravenscraig Castle, just east of Kirkcaldy, Fife, Scotland

This castle was originally planned and built by James II in 1460. It was intended to be for his queen, Mary of Guelders. Sadly, he died in August of that year and the work was then continued by his widow who trusted the work to the master mason Henry Meriloun who was one of several masons descended originally from a French family well-known for many fine buildings in Edinburgh.

It was said to be both an artillery base and a guard-post for the Firth of Forth but neither of those descriptions seem to have come about. There are no signs of gun ports on the seaward side of the castle.

The castle passed into the hands of the Sinclairs in about 1470 and between then and 1598 they had visits from both James V and James VI, who was later known to those to the south as James 1st.

These views were taken from the seaward side in early August 2015.

The first view is looking directly down on the castle with the recent flats in the background.


Ravenscraig Castle, just east of Kirkcaldy, Fife, Scotland

Further round to the east. The platform on the left with the information board - the castle is in the care of Historic Scotland - is the location of the queen's original planned grand hall.

Both tower houses can easily be seen.


Ravenscraig Castle, just east of Kirkcaldy, Fife, Scotland

Further back looking from the east with the high flats and Kirkcaldy.


Ravenscraig Castle, just east of Kirkcaldy, Fife, Scotland

Finally the view from the west showing the castle's location on the cliff.




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